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Volume 25 - Number 23

November 10, 2014

Worth Noting/The Week Ahead

Disparate Impact Theory of Legal Liability Struck Down. Last week, the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia dealt a heavy blow to the position of the Department of Housing and Urban Development – as well as the CFPB – that disparate impact claims are cognizable under the Fair Housing Act. In American Insurance Association v. U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, the judge struck down HUD’s disparate impact rule, determining that the Fair Housing Act prohibits “disparate treatment only.” In promulgating its disparate impact rule, the court said HUD exceeded its authority under the Administrative Procedures Act. “The ruling is in line with what we have long believed the law to be and consistent with what we argued in ...

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