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Volume 2014 - Number 22

June 6, 2014

Appeals Court Rebuffs Trial Court Judge’s Rejection Of SEC-Citi MBS Deal; S&P Lawsuits Sent Back to States

A New York federal judge was out of line and beyond his discretionary authority when he rejected the Securities and Exchange Commission’s proposed $285 million settlement with Citigroup in 2011 stemming from the bank’s alleged mishandling of MBS, an appeals court ruled this week. A three-judge panel of the U.S. Second Circuit Court of Appeals vacated the district court’s order, holding that Judge Jed Rakoff of the Southern District of New York abused his discretion by applying an incorrect legal standard to his review of the settlement. Rakoff refused to accept the deal between the SEC and Citi because it did not contain an admission or denial of guilt. The appeals court held...

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This weekly covers the secondary mortgage market, including mortgage-backed securities and asset-backed securities.



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After the November elections, how long will it take for a new Congress and White House to pass GSE reform legislation?

I’m confident a bill will be passed the first year.


2 to 3 years. GSE reform is complicated.


Sadly it won’t happen in a Clinton or Trump first term.


Not in my lifetime.


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