Advanced Search

Volume 2017 - Number 35

September 15, 2017

Freddie Mac G-fee Pricing Taking Cues from Credit-Risk Transfers and the Private Market

Credit-risk transfers can be used to calculate guarantee fees because they’re indicative of what the private market would charge for the risk taken on by a government-sponsored enterprise, according to Freddie Mac. But the mortgage giant explained that g-fees are likely more stable than a system that relies exclusively on credit-risk transfers. Kevin Palmer, Freddie’s senior vice president of single-family credit risk transfers, said in a white paper the significant amount of credit risk being transferred to the private capital markets provides a way to calculate a market-implied g-fee. Since 2013, the GSE has transferred much of the credit risk on $760 billion of MBS it guarantees. Based on the pricing of Freddie’s Structured Agency Credit Risk transactions over the past year, the market-implied g-fee has been...

Subscribers to Inside MBS & ABS have full access to all its stories and data online. Visitors may become subscribers for full access or may purchase individual articles and data.

Subscriber Log In

If you are a current subscriber or already purchased this article, please login below.

Forgot your password?

Already subscribe but haven't registered for all the benefits of the website?

Subscribe

This weekly covers the secondary mortgage market, including mortgage-backed securities and asset-backed securities.

 

Pay-Per-View

You can purchase this article for $55.00 without subscribing and always have access to it on insidemortgagefinance.com.

Pay Per View

Please contact Customer Service if you need assistance: 1-800-570-5744

Poll

With originations expected to drop in 2018, will your shop turn to non-QM/non-prime mortgage products as a way to bolster volumes?

Yes, definitely. We’re planning a launch.

33%

No. It’s still difficult compliance/regulatory-wise.

20%

Maybe. It’s under consideration.

33%

Not now. But things could change as 2018 progresses.

13%