Loan Originator Compensation Webinar






An Inside Mortgage Finance Webinar
Held Thursday, January 27, 2011

Paying mortgage originators will never be the same. The Federal Reserve Board has proposed major changes as part of its Truth in Lending rules. The Dodd-Frank legislation also spells out a new set of compensation requirements. And to further complicate matters, the Department of Labor recently issued an interpretation covering overtime for loan originators. The industry is waiting for clarification. Find out what these regulatory developments will mean for you and your business by listening to Inside Mortgage Finance’s Loan Originator Compensation: The New Rules webinar. A panel of industry experts explained the key issues and answered questions during this 90-minute session. Most of the impending changes will severely limit the mortgage industry’s historical approach of compensating originators based on loan terms. Learn what you can do to adapt to the new regulatory environment. Find out what can get you into legal hot water and what won’t. And learn what major lenders are doing to cope with the changes. These industry experts shared their insights and answered your questions:

  • Richard J. Andreano, Partner, Patton Boggs LLP
  • David S. Hay, GVP, Associate General Counsel, SunTrust Mortgage
  • Kristie D. Kully, Of Counsel, K&L Gates LLP
  • Guy D. Cecala, Publisher, Inside Mortgage Finance (moderator)

Inside Mortgage Finance’s Loan Originator Compensation webinar answered questions like these:

  • What are the major differences between the Fed rule and the Dodd-Frank statute?
  • Are the new compensation rules a trap for affiliated business arrangements?
  • How must mortgage broker payments be handled under the new rules?
  • Why are there so many different definitions of loan originator—and what you need to know about each one?
  • What are the challenges of converting sales staff to non-exempt status?
  • What are the appropriate elements in calculating volume-based compensation?
  • Can compensation vary based on the loan amount?
  • How do the Dodd-Frank Act and the Fed compensation rule differ on steering?
  • Should mortgage companies keep in mind RESPA and fair lending when developing their compensation plans?
  • Will the industry have to shift to “averaging” and other compensation practices?
  • From whom is the LO allowed to receive payment?
  • How are discount points allowed to be used?
  • What about the safe harbor, and is it legal?
  • Which two types of records will wholesalers have to retain to satisfy new requirements?
  • What’s happening with yield-spread premiums?
  • Can one compensate LOs based on borrowers’ credit scores?
  • Can there be different compensation based on the type of loan?
Conference CD and Manual - $225.00
MP3 and Manual - $197.00

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After the November elections, how long will it take for a new Congress and White House to pass GSE reform legislation?

I’m confident a bill will be passed the first year.


2 to 3 years. GSE reform is complicated.


Sadly it won’t happen in a Clinton or Trump first term.


Not in my lifetime.


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